That space between cells speaks


The lessons of tīpuna imprinted within, without, through and in between.

That space between cells speaks without words, screams with emotion.

I feel more deeply when I am still, calm and grounded.

Tangaroa-a-mua

I have consciously and unconsciously observed and felt maramataka – Māori lunar calendar. I come in and out of the awareness of what state te tai ao – the environment is in but I have come to know that it is always present. I have these moments when im coming up against something then I go ‘oh wait its Tangaroa, that’s why hinemoana is calling.’ It provides a deeper and collective understanding – a relief that ‘yes’ I am part of Te Ao Marama – this world.

Tai mate

The synchronicity of the environment is impeccable and so complexly simple all at the same time. I consider the turning tides and what this important moment brings. In front of a turning tide I consider the movement of the currents both forward and backwards and in this moment, in this slight in between is now. As I become aware of now it grows – no longer swelling forward, no longer swinging backwards, just now. Now is this moment of stillness and clarity my lungs expand, my thoughts soften. Oxygen enters and emancipate’s my body and my tears swell up behind my eyes that I didn’t know were in a waiting room ready to be released.

Whakaroau

When I was moving forward and shifting backwards, tears roll down my face. I feel a pulse at the back of my nose – hupe coming forward. I’m not sad but salty tears spread. It’s a moment of release. I realise this moment is perfect, everything I have learnt is woven into my skin, my cells that hold a million stories – thousands of years of knowledge. If I could only stay still enough to hear the words being spoken….”Haere mai! Haere mai! Haere mai ki te marae o hine!”

The lessons of tīpuna imprinted within, without, through and in between.

That space between cells speaks without words, screams with emotion.

I feel more deeply when I am still, calm and grounded.

Published by Tākuta Teah

Indigenous woman, partner, māmā, sister, daughter, aunty, artist, story catcher/teller, researcher, evaluator and academic. I draw on these identities to express, connect and articulate kotahitanga, mana motuhake and aroha.

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